Bret Hart Talks Montreal Screwjob, What His Career Might Have Looked Like If It Never Happened

WWE Hall of Famer Bret "The Hitman" Hart recently spoke to Fightful to discuss all thing pro-wrestling, including how he thinks his career would have turned out if the Montreal Screwjob never happened. Highlights are below.

On if the Montreal Screwjob never happened:

I was gonna work in some facet of the office. I was actually under, if my memory serves me right, I think was gonna take Pat Patterson’s job and work with the matches. I don’t know that would have been ideal for me. Just because of the work involved. It was probably something that, at the time, who knows what I’m going to do? I know that I still believe I had a lot of contributions to be made to the company and I would have been an asset to them over the years for ideas and just logic and things like that. It didn’t happen. I think that was more their loss than mine. I think once all the bad blood happened with the screwjob and all that kind of stuff, it was what they lost, I think, was immeasurable.

Says WWE screwed him out of 20 years of work:

You’ll never know what I would have brought to the WWE after 1997. But, I had so many good years left. I always think whatever happened with me and Vince and how stupid all that was and how unnecessary all that was, Shawn’s behavior and the whole reason all that happened was so stupid, really. If you look at all the matches that didn’t happen. Like, all the matches I didn’t have with Steve Austin after WrestleMania 13. All the matches I didn’t have with Undertaker. Matches I didn’t have with Shawn and for that matter, Triple H, and all the different storylines that could have played out of our so-called rivalries. Even Rock. There was some great wrestlers that were coming up. What they did to me was not necessary. I should have stayed there. Vince did what he did out of petty reasons. They screwed me out of a twenty-year contract. They spent more money on Mike Tyson the next year, paying him for fifteen minutes of refereeing, as opposed to what they would have paid me for twenty years of work. I’ll never understand the reasoning or the logic of what they did or how anyone can justify, and, I think, the loss of what they would have gained. All the different guys that would have benefited from working and teaching and passing on what I knew to the next generation. All that was lost.